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Dean Martin - Walking in A Winter Wonderland

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Dean Martin
"Walking in a Winter Wonderland"
"Winter Wonderland" is a winter song, popularly treated as a Christmastime pop standard, written in 1934 by Felix Bernard (music) and Richard B. Smith (lyricist). Through the decades it has been recorded by over 200 different artists.

Frank Sinatra - Have Yourself a Merry Christmas

Frank Sinatra
"Have Yourself a Merry Christmas"

"Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" is a song introduced by Judy Garland in the 1944 MGM musical Meet Me in St. Louis. Frank Sinatra later recorded a version with modified lyrics. The song was written by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane. In 2007, ASCAP ranked "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" the third most performed Christmas song during the preceding five years that had been written by ASCAP members.[3] In 2004 it finished at #76 in AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs rankings of the top tunes in American cinema.

Wiki Source

Bing Crosby with Andrew Sisters - Jingle Bells

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Bing Crosby - Jingle Bells
From Decca 78 record set # 403 
(Record book set issued in 1945)
 Side-9, record# 23281

Bing Crosby - It's Beginning To Look a Lot Like Christmas

Sunday, November 2, 2014

Bing Crosby - It's Beginning To Look a Lot Like Christmas
 
"It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas" is a classic Christmas song written in 1951 by Meredith Willson. The song was originally titled "It's Beginning to Look Like Christmas". The song has been recorded by many artists, but was a hit by Perry Como and The Fontane Sisters with Mitchell Ayres & His Orchestra on September 10, 1951, and released on RCA Victor as 47-4314 (45 rpm) and 20-4314 (78 rpm). Bing Crosby recorded a version on October 1, 1951, which was also widely played.
Wiki Source





Vaughn Monroe - Riders in the Sky

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Riders in the Sky: A Cowboy Legend
by Vaughn Monroe
(1948)
"(Ghost) Riders in the Sky: A Cowboy Legend" is a cowboy-styled country/western song written in 1948 by noted American songwriter Stan Jones.[1] A number of versions were crossover hits on the pop charts in 1949. The ASCAP database lists the song as "Riders in the Sky" (title code 480028324[2]), but the title has been written as "Ghost Riders", "Ghost Riders in the Sky", and "A Cowboy Legend".
wiki source


The Top 20 Greatest Songs of the 1940s

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Songlist:

1. White Christmas - Bing Crosby (1942)
2. Star Dust - Artie Shaw (1941)
3. Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer - Gene Autry (1949)
4. Paper Doll - The Mills Brothers (1943)
5. Body and Soul - Coleman Hawkins (1940)
6. Near You - Francis Craig and His Orchestra (1947)
7. The Christmas Song - Nat "King" Cole (1946)
8. I'll Never Smile Again - Tommy Dorsey with Frank Sinatra & The Pied Pipers (1940)
9. Buttons and Bows - Dinah Shore and Her Harper Valley Boys (1948)
10. Frenesi - Artie Shaw (1940)
11. Sentimental Journey - Les Brown with Doris Day (1945)
12. Swinging on a Star - Bing Crosby with John Scott Trotter's Orchestra & the Williams Brothers Quartet (1944)
13. Peg O' My Heart - The Harmonicats (1947)
14. Riders in the Sky (A Cowboy Legend) - Vaughn Monroe (1949)
15. Chattanooga Choo Choo - Glenn Miller with Tex Beneke & the Four Modernaires (1941)
16. The Gypsy - The Ink Spots (1946)
17. I've Heard That Song Before - Harry James with Helen Forrest (1943)
18. When You Wish Upon a Star - Cliff Edwards (1940)
19. Heartaches - Ted Weems with Elmo Tanner (1947)
20. You Are My Sunshine - Jimmie Davis (1940)


Video and track information source

Nancy Walker - Shady Lady Bird

Thursday, August 14, 2014


Nancy Walker
"Shady Lady Bird"
(1941)



Here's a tune from the Ralph Blane-Hugh Martin score of the 1941 musical "Best Foot Forward," the play in which comic actress-singer Nancy Walker made her Broadway stage debut.
Download mp3 from Amazon

Bing Crosby and Andrew Sisters - Don't Fence Me In

Bing Crosby and the Andrew Sisters
"Don't Fence Me In"
(1945)

"Don't Fence Me In" is a popular American song written in 1934, with music by Cole Porter and lyrics by Robert Fletcher and Cole Porter. Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.[1]
Wiki Source
Download mp3 from Amazon

Evelyn Knight - A Little Bird Told Me

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Evelyn Knight and the Stardusters
A Little Bird Told Me
(1948)
Download this MP3 from Amazon.com

Lyrics:

A Little Bird Told Me
A little bird told me that you love me
And I believe that you do
This little bird told me I was fallin'
Fallin' for no one but you

There's no use denying
Might as well confess
Of all the boys I know, dear
I'm sure I love you best

The little bird told me we'd be happy
And I believe that it's true
A little bird told me we'd be married
And I believe that it's true

This little bird told me when we marry
We'll have a pretty cottage
Not too far
All fenced in like a movie stars

We'll have a great dane pup
We'll call him Ace
Lying there by the fireplace
A goldfish pond and a wishing well
Everything is gonna turn out swell

A little bird told me we'd be happy
And now I know that it's true
Come June it's bound to be true

Vaughn Monroe - What is This Thing Called Love

Friday, August 8, 2014

Vaughn Monroe
"What Is This Thing Called Love"

LPM-11
VAUGHN MONROE SINGS COLE PORTER FOR DANCING
Released: 1951
10-inch 33 1/3 LP and 78 set

So In Love [2]
I Concentrate On You
Easy To Love
I Get A Kick Out Of You
Don't Fence Me In
What Is This Thing Called Love

Vaughn Monroe - Let It Snow

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Vaughn Monroe
Let It Snow
(1945)

First recorded in 1945 by Vaughn Monroe,[1] it became a popular hit, reaching No. 1 on the Billboard music chart the following year. One of the best-selling songs of all time, "Let It Snow!" has been covered countless times. Due to its seasonal lyrics, it is commonly regarded as a Christmas song. However, the song has no Christmas references and is therefore a seasonal song shared by those who do not join in the celebration of Christmas.
Wiki Source

Vaughn Monroe - Tangerine

Sunday, August 3, 2014

Vaughn Monroe - Tangerine
(1941)


Vaughn Monroe - Dream

 
Vaughn Monroe - Dream

Vaughn Wilton Monroe (October 7, 1911 – May 21, 1973) was an American baritone singer, trumpeter and big band leader and actor, most popular in the 1940s and 1950s. He has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; for recording and radio.
Wiki Source



Slang Words from the 1940s

Sunday, July 6, 2014

We all know the Culture was very Hip in the 1940s. Are you interested in the way they spoke back then? Well, here are some examples of slang that were in the 1940s. Enjoy:

Bum rap - false accusation
  • Bust your chops – This phrase was basically meant as a scolding, maybe to yell, but not to literally hit someone.
  • Buzz – We still use this word today and it still refers to being tipsy.
  • Call girl – This is another phrase that is used today. Back in the 1940s it referred to a by appointment only prostitute. Today it still refers to a prostitute, however more of an upscale prostitute.
  • Cheesy – Yet another word that has managed to stay in contemporary vernacular. Back in the 1940s it meant cheap.
  • Chicken – In the 1940s this word referred to a person who was being a coward about something. Today it still means the same thing.
  • Chrome-dome – This used to be an offensive word for a bald headed man.  While “chrome-dome” is not exclusively used to refer to any bald man, the word “dome” still refers to the head.
  • Cold – In the 1940s this word referred to leads that could no longer be pursued. Today it remains in contemporary vernacular meaning the same thing.
  • Cracks me up – This means to make someone laugh.
  • Dope – Back in the 1940s this word meant information, however now it is another word for drugs.
  • Drop – This word meant to kill.
  • Fat-head – In the 1940s people called stupid or foolish people  a fat-head.
  • Fix –This word is sometimes still used today, and it means a dose of drugs (mainly narcotics); in the 1940s it was used when referencing drug fiends.
  • Geezer – This word was a derogatory term for an older person.
  • Gas – No this was not what you put in your car, it was however a word used to refer to either a good time or something that was really funny.
 Dictionary Source

Annette Hanshaw - I've Got A Feeling I'm Falling

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Annette Hanshaw
I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling

Download music of Annette for free on http://www.archive.org/search.php?que...

Her singing style was relaxed and suited to the new jazz-influenced pop music of the late 1920s. Although she had a low opinion of her own singing, she continued to have fans because she combined the voice of an ingenue with the spirit of a flapper. Hanshaw was known as "The Personality Girl," and her trademark was saying "That's all" in a cheery voice at the end of many of her records.[1]
Wikipedia Source


Fats Domino - I'm Ready

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Fats Domino - I'm Ready

When I first heard this song, a great feeling of joy and inspiration overwhelmed me. I think I played it over and over again for like an hour. For those of you that do not know Fats Domino, here is a quote from wikipedia:

Antoine "Fats" Domino Jr. (born February 26, 1928) is an American rhythm and blues and rock and roll pianist and singer-songwriter. Domino released five gold (million-copy-selling) records before 1955.[1] He also had 35 Top 40 American hits and has a music style based on traditional rhythm and blues ensembles of bass, piano, electric guitar, drums, and saxophone.[1]
Here is the song:

Here are the Lyrics:

"I'm Ready"


Well, I'm ready, I'm willin', and I'm able to rock and roll all night
I'm ready, I'm willin', and I'm able to rock and roll all night
Come on, pretty baby, we gonna rock, we gonna roll until the broad daylight

Because I'm ready, mm-mm-mm
And I'm able, mm-mm-mm
I'm willin' and I'm able so you better come and go with me
We gonna rock and roll till tomorrow 'bout three

Talkin' on the phone is not my speed
Don't send me no letter 'cause I can't read
Don't be long 'cause I'll be gone
We gonna rock and roll all night long

'Cause I'm ready, I'm willin', and I'm able to rock and roll all night
I'm ready, I'm willin', and I'm able to rock and roll all night
Come on, pretty baby, we gonna rock, we gonna roll until tomorrow night

Talkin' on the phone is not my speed
Don't send me no letter 'cause I can't read
Don't be long 'cause I'll be gone
We gonna rock and roll all night long

'Cause I'm ready, I'm willin', and I'm able to rock and roll all night
I'm ready, I'm willin', and I'm able to rock and roll all night
Come on, pretty baby, we gonna rock, we gonna roll until tomorrow night


Happy Memorial Day!

Monday, May 26, 2014

Happy Memorial Day to the Veterans of these United States!


Happy St. Patrick's Day from Blast2thePast

Monday, March 17, 2014

Angela Greene - 1940s

Angela Greene was born on February 24, 1922 in Dublin, Ireland as Angela Katherine Greene. She was an actress, known for Futureworld (1976), Night of the Blood Beast (1958) and At War with the Army (1950). She was married to Stuart Warren Martin. She died on February 9, 1978 in Los Angeles, California, USA.
You can view her filmography here - http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0338664/

Shirley Temple Passes Away

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Shirley Temple Dead at 85. Shirley Temple Dead at 85. She was most known for her roles as a child in The Little Princess, Heidi and Curly Top. Born 1930.

Lucky Millinder

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Lucius Venable "Lucky" Millinder (August 8, 1910[1] – September 28, 1966)[2] was an American rhythm and blues and swing bandleader. Although he could not read or write music, did not play an instrument and rarely sang, his showmanship and musical taste made his bands successful. His group was said to have been the greatest big band to play rhythm and blues,[3] and gave a break to a number of influential musicians at the dawn of the rock and roll era. He is a 1986 inductee of the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame.
Wikipedia Source

Are You Ready?
Decca 18529 A
July 29, 1942
Recorded in NYC
Written by :
Lucky Millinder, Trevor Bacon, Henri Woods

Lucky Millinder and his Orchestra
William Scott, Dizzy Gillespie, Nelson Bryant - trumpets
George Stevenson, Joe Britton - trombones
Billy Bowen, Tab Smith - alto saxes
Stafford Simon, Doug Young - tenor saxes
Ernest Purce - baritone sax
Bill Doggett - piano
Trevor Bacon - guitar, vocals
Nick Fenton - bass
Panama Francis - drums

Blasting to the Past

Sunday, January 5, 2014

Hello everyone. Sorry it has taken so long to add a post on Blast2thepast.com. I have been busy with my artwork. As you know, I specialize in blasting to the past. It is what I do. Well, I have merged that hobby with another. I draw the past. So if you are interested, I would like for you to check out my artwork. Visit these websites to check it out:

fineartamerica
deviantart
redbubble

Also do not forget to check out all the cool merchandise I am creating with my art at
Zazzle

Thanks for visiting Blast2thePast.com and also thanks for being a loyal visitor.



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