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Gus Arnheim and his Orchestra - I'm Feathering a Nest

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

recorded 4/28/1929

Gus Arnheim (September 4, 1897 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – January 19, 1955 in Los Angeles, California) was an early popular band leader. He is noted for writing several songs with his first hit being "I Cried for You" from 1923. He was most popular in the 1920s and 1930s.[1] He also had a few small acting roles.[2]
Armheim's first recorded for OKeh in 1928-1929, when he signed with Victor in 1929 and stayed through 1933. He signed with Brunswick and recorded through 1937. In 1928-31, Arnheim had an extended engagement at the Cocoanut Grove in Los Angeles. In 1930, when Paul Whiteman finished filming The King of Jazz for Universal, The Rhythm Boys vocal trio, consisting of Bing Crosby, Harry Barris and Al Rinker decided to stay in California and they signed up with Arnheim's band. While the Rhythm Boys only recorded one song with Arnheim, "Them There Eyes", which also happened to be The Rhythm Boys final recording, Arnheim's Orchestra backed Crosby on a number of songs released by Victor Records in 1931.[3] These popular records, coupled with Arnheim's radio broadcasts featuring Crosby's solo vocals, were a key element to the beginning of Crosby's popularity as a crooner.
Wikipedia Source: Gus Arnheim

Thank you

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Hello Blog Visitors,

There will be lots of changes ahead for me. Me and my family are currently relocating at the end of June. Blast2thepast is a great joy for me. There will be many more posts to come. For now, enjoy the content already presented here. It has been a very busy time.

According to the stats, Blast2thepast is getting more frequent traffic. This is a good thing. That means that the past is not forgotten. I want to thank all of you that frequently visit this blog. If you enjoy this blog become a follower. There are many people like myself that enjoy the past. Thanks for making the past a blast.

Kevin Dellinger