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Sammy Davis Jr. sings 'Because of You'

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Sammy Davis Jr. sings 'Because of You' 

The multi-talented Sammy Davis, Jr. sings "Because of You" in this 1954 television appearance. The number allows Sammy to do a number of celebrity impressions, such as Nat King Cole, Tony Bennett, James Cagney, Jimmy Stewart, Cary Grant, and Jerry Lewis. No doubt about it--Sammy was an amazing performer.

Louis Jordan - Buzz me Baby


Louis Jordan - Buzz me Baby


Louis Jordan (July 8, 1908 – February 4, 1975[1]) was a pioneering American jazz, blues and rhythm & blues musician, songwriter and bandleader who enjoyed his greatest popularity from the late 1930s to the early 1950s. Known as "The King of the Jukebox", Jordan was highly popular with both black and white audiences in the later years of the swing era. In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked him #59 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[2]
Wikipedia Source

Swing Time - Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire

Swing Time (1936)

Director:

George Stevens

Writers:

Howard Lindsay (screenplay), Allan Scott (screenplay), and 5 more credits »

Stars: 

Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers and Victor Moore

 

Storyline

Lucky is tricked into missing his wedding to Margaret by the other members of Pop's magic and dance act, and has to make $25000 to be allowed to marry her. He and Pop go to New York where they run into Penny, a dancing instructor. She and Lucky form a successful dance partnership, but romance is blighted (till the end of the film at least!) by his old attachment to Margaret and hers for Ricardo, the band leader who won't play for them to dance together. Written by Sebastian Gibbs <sjg94@aber.ac.uk>  

Perry Como Biography

Perry Como Biography




We all enjoy those magic moments of listening to Perry Como. From a time of expressing happiness in music, Perry did a wonderful job of keeping this mood throughout his career. This is his trademark.

According to Wikipedia:

Pierino Ronald "Perry" Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an American singer and television personality. During a career spanning more than half a century he recorded exclusively for the RCA Victor label after signing with it in 1943.[1] "Mr. C.", as he was nicknamed, sold millions of records for Radio Corporation of America (RCA) and pioneered a weekly musical variety television show, which set the standards for the genre and proved to be one of the most successful in television history. His combined success on television and popular recordings was not matched by any other artist of the time.[2] A popular television performer and recording artist, Perry Como produced numerous hit records with record sales so high the label literally stopped counting at Como's behest.[3] His weekly television shows and seasonal specials were broadcast throughout the world and his popularity seemingly had no geographical or language boundaries.[4][5] Como's appeal spanned generations and he was widely respected for both his professional standards and the conduct in his personal life. In the official RCA Records Billboard magazine memorial, his life was summed up in these few words: "50 years of music and a life well lived. An example to all."[6] Composer Ervin Drake said of him,"... [o]ccasionally someone like Perry comes along and won't 'go with the flow' and still prevails in spite of all the bankrupt others who surround him and importune him to yield to their values. Only occasionally."[7]

One of the many factors in his success was Como's insistence on his principles of good taste; if he considered something to be in bad or poor taste, it was not in the show or broadcast.[8][9] When a remark made by Julius La Rosa about television personality Arthur Godfrey on The Perry Como Show was misconstrued, Como offered an on-air apology at the beginning of his next show, against the advice of his staff.[10][11][12] While his performance of "Ave Maria" was a tradition of his holiday television programs, Como refused to sing it at live performances, saying, "It's not the time or place to do it.", even though it was the number one request of his audiences.[13][14] Another was his naturalness; the man viewers saw on the screen was the same person who could be encountered behind a supermarket shopping cart, at a bowling alley, or in a kitchen making breakfast.[15][16][17] From his first Chesterfield Supper Club television show, if scripts were written at all, they were based on the way Como would say something.[9][18] Como was not devoid of a temper, and it could be seen at times as a result of the frustrations of daily life. His music director from 1948 – 1963, Mitchell Ayres, said, "Perry has a temper like everyone else. And he loses his temper at the normal things everyone else does. When we're driving, for instance, and somebody cuts him off, he really lets the offender have it."[19][20]

Como received five Emmys from 1955 to 1959,[21] a Christopher Award (1956) and shared a Peabody Award with good friend Jackie Gleason in 1956.[22][23] He was inducted into the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame in 1990[24][25][26] and received a Kennedy Center Honor in 1987.[27] Posthumously, Como received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002;[28] he was inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame in 2006 and the Hit Parade Hall of Fame in 2007.[29][30] Como has the distinction of having three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work in radio, television, and music.[31]

Wikipedia Source

Thirteenth Guest (1932)

Monday, May 30, 2011



Thirteenth Guest (1932)

Director:
Albert Ray
Writers:
Armitage Trail (book), Frances Hyland (screenplay), and 1 more credit »
Stars:
Ginger Rogers, Lyle Talbot and J. Farrell MacDonald
Storyline

13 years before the movie opens, there was a dinner party, at which the 13th guest failed to show up. The master of the manner has died, and left the bulk of his estate to this 13th guest, but nobody knows who that is. Now someone is murdering the remaining guests, and placing their dead bodies at the table, in the same seat they had occupied 13 years before. Written by John Oswalt

Killer Dill (1947)



Killer Dill (1947)

Stars:
Stuart Erwin, Anne Gwynne and Frank Albertson
Director: Lewis D. Collins
Producer: Max M. King
Production Company: Nivel Pictures
Film Length: 75 minutes
Audio/Visual: sound, b&w
Keywords: comedy

Storyline

Door-to-door salesman Johnny Dill, the exact double of a notorious gangster, finds himself struck between the forces of good and evil.

Fit for a King (1937)



Fit for a King (1937)

Director: Edward Sedgwick
Producer: David L. Loew
Production Company: David E. Loew Productions
Audio/Visual: sound, b&w

King Solomon's Mines (1937)



King Solomon's Mines (1937)

Director: Robert Stevenson
Production Company: Gaumont British Picture Corporation Ltd.
Audio/Visual: sound, black & white
Keywords: action/adventure

Meet John Doe (1941)






Meet John Doe (1941)

Stars:
Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwyck and Edward Arnold
Director: Frank Capra
Production Company: Warner Brothers
Film Length: 122 minutes
Audio/Visual: sound, b&w
Keywords: Comedy; pdmovies

Creative Commons license: Public Domain

Storyline

As a parting shot, fired reporter Ann Mitchell prints a fake letter from unemployed "John Doe," who threatens suicide in protest of social ills. The paper is forced to rehire Ann and hires John Willoughby to impersonate "Doe." Ann and her bosses cynically milk the story for all it's worth, until the made-up "John Doe" philosophy starts a whole political movement. At last everyone, even Ann, takes her creation seriously...but publisher D.B. Norton has a secret plan. Written by Rod Crawford

Angel on my Shoulder (1946)



Angel on my Shoulder (1946)

Stars:
Paul Muni, Anne Baxter and Claude Rains
Director: Archie Mayo
Production Company: Premiere Productions / United Artists
Film Length: 100 minutes
Audio/Visual: sound, b&w
Keywords: Comedy

Creative Commons license: Public Domain

Storyline

Gangster Eddie Kagel is killed by a trusted lieutenant and finds himself in Harry Redmond Jr's special-effects Hell, where Nick/The Devil sees that he is an-exact double for a judge who Nick doesn't approve of. Eddie is agreeable to having his soul transferred to the judge's body, as it will give him a chance to avenge himself on his killer. But every action taken by Eddie (as the judge) results in good rather than evil and, to Nick's dismay, the reputation and influence of the judge is enhanced, rather than impaired by Eddie. And Eddie also falls in love with the judge's fiancée, Barbara. Even Eddie's planned revenge fails and Nick is forced to concede defeat. He returns to Hell, taking Eddie with him, after Eddie has extracted his promise that Nick will not molest the judge or Barbara in the future. Written by Les Adams

The Three Stooges - Brideless Groom (1947)



Brideless Groom (1947)

Stars: The Three Stooges
Director: Edward Bernds
Producer: Hugh McCollum, Jules White
Production Company: Columbia Pictures Corporation
Audio/Visual: sound, b&w
Keywords: comedy; short; three stooges

Early 1930s Radio Broadcasting

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Early 1930s Radio Broadcasting

The Lone Ranger (1949)


The Lone Ranger - Season 1, Episodes 1 - 3


Buy on Amazon
The Lone Ranger is an American western television series starring Clayton Moore (John Hart from 1952 to 1954) and Jay Silverheels as Tonto. The live-action series initially featured Gerald Mohr as the episode narrator. Fred Foy served as both narrator and announcer of the radio series from 1948 to its finish and became announcer of the television version when story narration was dropped there. This was by far the highest-rated television program on the ABC network in the early 1950s and its first true "hit."

Although George W. Trendle retained the title of producer, he recognized that his experience in radio would not be adequate for producing the television series. For this, he hired veteran MGM film producer Jack Chertok. Chertok served as the producer for the first 182 episodes as well as for a rarely seen 1955 color special retelling the origin.

Numerous western stars guested on The Lone Ranger. John M. Pickard appeared in different roles in seven episodes.

The first 78 episodes were produced and broadcast for 78 consecutive weeks without any breaks or reruns. Then the entire 78 episodes were shown again before any new episodes were produced. All were shot in Utah and California.

When it came time to produce another batch of 52 episodes, there was a wage dispute with Clayton Moore (until his death, the actor insisted the problem was creative differences), and John Hart was hired to play the role of the Lone Ranger. Once again, the 52 new episodes were aired in sequence followed by 52 weeks rerunning them. Despite expectations that the mask would make the switch workable, Hart was not accepted in the role, and his episodes were not seen again until the 1980s.

At the end of the fifth year of the television series, Trendle sold the Lone Ranger rights to Jack Wrather, who bought them on August 3, 1954. Wrather immediately rehired Clayton Moore to play the Lone Ranger and another 52 episodes were produced. Once again, they were broadcast as a full year of new episodes followed by a full year of reruns.

The final season saw a number of changes, the most obvious at the time being an episode count of the by-then industry standard 39. Wrather invested money out of his own pocket to film in color—then-perennial third place finisher ABC telecasting only in black and white—and to go back outdoors for more than just second-unit style action footage, the series having been otherwise restricted to studio sound stages after the first filming block. Another big change, not readily detectable by the viewers, was replacing Jack Chertok with producer Sherman A. Harris. By this time, Chertok had established his own television production company and was busy producing other shows.

Wrather decided not to negotiate further with the network and took the property to the big screen, canceling TV production. The last new episode of the color series was broadcast June 6, 1957, and the series ended September 12, 1957, although ABC reaped the benefits of daytime reruns for several more years. Wrather's company produced two modestly budgeted theatrical features, The Lone Ranger (1956) (the cast included former child actress Bonita Granville, who had by then married Wrather after his divorce from a daughter of former Texas Governor W. Lee O'Daniel) and The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold (1958).

Cast * Fred Foy as Announcer (221 episodes, 1949--1957) * Jay Silverheels as Tonto (217 episodes, 1949--1957) * Clayton Moore as The Lone Ranger (208 episodes, 1949--1951, 1954--1957) * John Hart as The Lone Ranger (52 episodes, 1952--1953) * Gerald Mohr as Narrator (16 episodes, 1949) * Lane Bradford as Duke Wade (15 episodes, 1949--1957) * Chuck Courtney as Dan Reid (Lone Ranger's nephew) (14 episodes, 1950--1955)

Tyler MacDuff, who guest-starred in three Lone Ranger episodes from 1953 to 1957, was the only person to say on television both "Who was that masked man?" and "That was the Lone Ranger!" Kime Spalding guest-starred in three The Lone Ranger episodes from 1950 to 1953 at the beginning of his short acting career. The character actor I. Stanford Jolley made his first appearances in television westerns in 1950 and over the following three years appeared in six episodes of The Lone Ranger.

On March 31, 2009, Mill Creek Entertainment released the box set "Gun Justice Featuring The Lone Ranger" with other westerns including Annie Oakley, The Adventures of Kit Carson, The Cisco Kid, Cowboy G-Men, Judge Roy Bean, The Gabby Hayes Show, and The Roy Rogers Show.

On November 11, 2009, a 75th Anniversary edition was released to commemorate the show.

Youtube Source

Boy! What a Girl! (1947)



Stars:
Tim Moore, Elwood Smith and Duke Williams
Director: Arthur H. Leonard
Producer: Jack Goldberg, Arthur H. Leonard
Production Company: Herald Pictures
Film Length: 70 minutes
Audio/Visual: sound, black and white
Keywords: Musical; Comedy

Storyline

Two small-time (aspiring to be big-time) producers are trying to convince a Chicago businessman to finance half of their show, while the other half is to be financed by a mysterious Mme. Deborah. But when Madame Deborah is not on hand to meet the money-man from Chicago, an ex-prizefighter is dressed to pose as her. Music and dancing provided by Deek Watson and His Brown Dots, 'Big' Sid Catlett and his band, and Ann Cornell and the International Jitterbugs. Drummer Gene Krupa has a drumming cameo. Written by Les Adams

Creative Commons license: Public Domain

Doll Face (1945)



Stars:
Vivian Blaine, Dennis O'Keefe and Perry Como
Director: Lewis Seiler
Producer: Bryan Foy
Production Company: Twentieth Century Fox
Film Length: 80 minutes
Audio/Visual: sound, black and white
Keywords: Romance

Storyline

Burlesque queen Doll Face Carroll is dismissed from an audition for a legitimate Broadway show because she lacks culture. Her boss/manager Mike decides that she can get both culture and plenty of publicity by writing her autobiography. He hires a ghost writer to do all the work, but doesn't count on the possibility that Doll Face and her collaborator might have more than a book on their minds. Written by Daniel Bubbeo

Creative Commons license: Public Domain

Royal Wedding (1951)











Royal Wedding (1951)

Stars:
Fred Astaire, Jane Powell and Peter Lawford
Director: Stanley Donen
Producer: Arthur Freed
Sponsor: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Film Length: 93 minutes
Audio/Visual: sound, color
Keywords: musical; comedy; dance; romance


Storyline

Tom and Ellen Bowen are a brother and sister dance act whose show closes in New York. Their agent books them in London for the same period as the Royal Wedding. They travel by ship where Ellen meets and becomes involved with Lord John Brindale. This causes her to miss a rehearsal. Tom (Astaire) uses the time to dance with a hat rack and gym equipment. Later Tom and Ellen attempt a graceful dance number as the ship rolls. Upon arrival Tom holds auditions and meets Sara. There is much indecision by the siblings about their romantic partners even though they are in-the-clouds. Tom dances on the walls and ceiling of his hotel room. All ends well in this light musical. By the way, there is a vaudeville-style dance number in their show that features slapstick. It's a hoot. Written by Paul Corr

Creative Commons license: Public Domain

Second Chorus (1940)




Second Chorus (1940)

Stars:
Fred Astaire, Paulette Goddard and Artie Shaw
Director: H.C. Potter
Producer: Boris Morros
Production Company: Astor Pictures Corporation
Film Length: 84 minutes
Audio/Visual: sound, b&w

Creative Commons license: Public Domain




Storyline

Danny and Hank are surprised when Artie Shaw hires competent manager Ellen away from their college band. The two trumpet players scheme to get into Shaw's outfit themselves, each trying to trump the other's plays. Written by Diana Hamilton

Nat King Cole - Route 66

Play this song next time you are on vacation going down that highway.

"(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66", often rendered simply as "Route 66", is a popular song and rhythm and blues standard, composed in 1946 by American songwriter Bobby Troup. It was first recorded in the same year by Nat King Cole, and was subsequently covered by many artists including Chuck Berry in 1961, The Rolling Stones in 1964, and Depeche Mode in 1987. The song's lyrics follow the path of the U.S. Route 66 highway, which used to run a long distance across the U.S., going from Chicago, Illinois, to Los Angeles, California. The title was suggested to Troup by his first wife, Cynthia
Wikipedia Source.

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - Too Hot to Handle

A dance number of Fred Astaire and Ginger Roger's in Roberta (1935). It's actually called "Hard to Handle", but I think they're just hot in their teasing manner here. This is one of their most fun-loving routines, including the signature bugle call. Credit to Warner Bros.
Youtube Source

1930s Music - A Time of Great Talent

Despite the economic hardships of the 1930s, it was a time of great talent. Much came out of this time to uplift the spirits of the people. Many of the great talents we have today are contributed to these times birthing a new wave of inspiration to the future of music.

The Best Love Songs of the 1940s

A compilation of popular love songs from the 40s.

Judy Garland - Biography

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Source is from Wikipedia.


Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American actress and singer. Through a career that spanned 45 of her 47 years, Garland attained international stardom as an actress in musical and dramatic roles, as a recording artist and on the concert stage. Respected for her versatility, she received a juvenile Academy Award, won a Golden Globe Award, as well as Grammy Awards and a Special Tony Award. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in A Star is Born and for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in the 1961 film, Judgement at Nuremberg.
At 40 years of age, she was the youngest recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in the motion picture industry.
After appearing in vaudeville with her sisters, Garland was signed to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer as a teenager. There she made more than two dozen films, including nine with Mickey Rooney and the 1939 film with which she would be most identified, The Wizard of Oz. After 15 years, Garland was released from the studio but gained renewed success through record-breaking concert appearances, including a return to acting beginning with critically acclaimed performances.
Despite her professional triumphs, Garland battled personal problems throughout her life. Insecure about her appearance, her feelings were compounded by film executives who told her she was unattractive and manipulated her on-screen physical appearance. Garland was plagued by financial instability, often owing hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes. She married five times, with her first four marriages ending in divorce. Garland died of an accidental drug overdose at the age of 47, leaving children Liza Minnelli, Lorna Luft and Joey Luft.
In 1997, Garland was posthumously awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1999, the American Film Institute placed her among the ten greatest female stars in the history of American cinema.

Glenn Miller Medley with Judy Garland and Martha Raye

Glen Miller Medley, Judy Garland, Martha Raye:
"I've Heard that Song Before", "Moonlight Cocktail", "Pennsylvania 6-5000", "Elmer's Tune", "At Last", "St. Louis Blues March"


Source

Glenn Miller - I've got a Gal in Kalamazoo


Glenn Miller Orchestra - I've Got a Gal in Kalamazoo




This song was #1 in 1942.

This is the full clip of the Glenn Miller band with Tex Beneke and one of the greatest dance routines ever in movies by the Nicholas Brothers. From the 1942 movie "Orchestra Wives"

Youtube Source

"(I've Got a Gal In) Kalamazoo" is a #1 popular song recorded by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra in 1942. It was written by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren and published in 1942. It was featured in the musical film Orchestra Wives and was recorded by Glenn Miller & His Orchestra, featuring Tex Beneke, Marion Hutton and The Modernaires, who released it as an A side 78 in 1942, 27934-A. The B side was "At Last".

Wikipedia Source

Perry Como - Magic Moments



"Magic Moments" is a popular song with music by Burt Bacharach and lyrics by Hal David, one of the first compositions by that duo. The song was published in 1957.
The biggest hit version of the song was recorded by Perry Como in 1957, and became a hit in early 1958. The peak position is hard to track precisely, due to the multiple charts used in Billboard. The overall impact of the song probably fell just below the top ten. The song was also a 1958 hit in Italy, while in the United Kingdom it spent eight weeks at number one, becoming Como's biggest ever hit there. A much less successful UK cover version recorded by Ronnie Hilton reached #22 on the UK Singles Chart.
Source

Classic Commercial for Coca-Cola (1953)


I like Coke and some of you may agree. Coke is refreshing with that pure bright taste and sparkle. Now we get to celebrate with fresh Aspertame. <snicker snicker>

Return to Me - Perry Como and Dean Martin


Dean Martin and Perry Como in the Perry Como Show which aired on NBC in the 1950s.

Andrews Sisters - Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy

Friday, May 27, 2011



Origins of the song

The song was written by Don Raye and Hughie Prince, and was recorded at Decca's Hollywood studios on January 2, 1941, nearly a year before the United States entered World War II but after the start of a peacetime draft to expand the armed forces in anticipation of American involvement. The flipside was "Bounce Me Brother With a Solid Four". The Andrews Sisters introduced the song in the 1941 Abbott and Costello film Buck Privates, which was in production when they made the record. "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song.
It is closely based on an earlier Raye-Prince hit, "Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar," which is about a virtuoso boogie-woogie piano player.
Source

Glenn Miller - Moonlight Serenade


"Moonlight Serenade" is an American popular song with original music by Glenn Miller and subsequent lyrics by Mitchell Parish. When Miller recorded "Sunrise Serenade" in 1939, he placed this song on the back. The song, recorded on April 4, 1939 on RCA Bluebird, was a Top Ten hit on the U.S. pop charts in 1939, reaching number three on the Billboard charts, where it stayed for fifteen weeks. It was the no.5 top pop hit of 1939 on Billboard in the year end Billboard tally of the top records of 1939. Glenn Miller had 5 records in the top 20 songs of 1939 on Billboard's list. In the UK, "Moonlight Serenade" was released as the A side of a 78 on His Master's Voice with "American Patrol" as the B side. The recording reached number twelve in the UK in March, 1954, staying on the chart for one week. In a medley with "Little Brown Jug" and "In the Mood", "Moonlight Serenade" reached number thirteen on the UK charts in January, 1976, where it stayed for eight weeks. It was an immediate phenomenon when first released in May 1939 as an instrumental arrangement and was adopted as Miller's signature tune. The recording was also issued as a V-Disc, No. 39A, in November, 1943.
Source

Glenn Miller - In the Mood

Tex Beneke and the Glenn Miller Orchestra perform the jazz classic: "In The Mood" (1946)


Alton Glenn Miller (March 1, 1904 – missing December 15, 1944) was an American jazz musician (trombone), arranger, composer, and bandleader in the swing era. He was one of the best-selling recording artists from 1939 to 1943, leading one of the best known "Big Bands". Miller's notable recordings include "In the Mood", "American Patrol", "Chattanooga Choo Choo", "A String of Pearls", "Tuxedo Junction", "Moonlight Serenade", "Little Brown Jug" and "Pennsylvania 6-5000". While he was traveling to entertain U.S. troops in France during World War II, Glenn Miller disappeared in bad weather over the English Channel.
Source

Anything Goes


Anything Goes is a musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. The original book was a collaborative effort by Guy Bolton and P.G. Wodehouse, heavily revised by the team of Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. The story concerns madcap antics aboard an ocean liner bound from New York to London. Billy Crocker is a stowaway in love with heiress Hope Harcourt, who is engaged to Lord Evelyn Oakleigh. Nightclub singer Reno Sweeney and Public Enemy #13 Moonface Martin aid Billy in his quest to win Hope. The musical introduced such songs as "Anything Goes," "You're the Top," and "I Get a Kick Out of You."

Source

Judy Garland "Get Happy" (1950)



Though it's called Summer Stock, this marvelous "let's put on a show" musical - the final one that showcased the peerless pair of Judy Garland and Gene Kelly - is a delight for all seasons. The story is simple: a homespun farm family allows a Broadway production company to rehearse its new show on their property - if the performers "pay" their way by pitching in with all the farm chores! But the pleasures are abundant: a show-stopping, all-star "Battle of the Dances" that starts out as a square dance and blossoms into a cavalcade of high-stepping dance favorites; Kelly's marvelous song and later dance to "You, Wonderful You;" four of the most popular comedic screen actors ever: Phil Silvers, Eddie Bracken, Hans Conried and Marjorie Main; and Garland's incomparable "Get Happy," a smashing sequence that's one of her peak movie moments.
Source

Judy Garland - Somewhere Over The Rainbow

Judy Garland - "The Wizard of Oz" - singing "Somewhere over the Rainbow."

Over the Rainbow" (often referred to as "Somewhere Over the Rainbow") is a classic Academy Award-winning ballad song with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by E.Y. Harburg. It was written for the movie The Wizard of Oz, and was sung by Judy Garland in the movie. Over time it would become Garland's signature song.
In the film, part of the song is played by the MGM orchestra over the opening credits. About 5 minutes later, Garland, in the role of Dorothy Gale, sings "Over the Rainbow" after unsuccessfully trying to get her aunt and uncle to listen to her regarding an unpleasant incident involving Dorothy's dog Toto and the nasty spinster Miss Gulch (Margaret Hamilton). Dorothy's Aunt Em tells her to "find a place where you won't get yourself into any trouble", prompting Dorothy to walk off by herself and sing the song. The famous sequence itself, as well as the entirety of the Kansas scenes, was directed (though uncredited) by King Vidor.
Source

Frank Sinatra - Old Man River (1946)


Lovely Video of Frank Sinatra singing Old Man River

The song was first performed in the original stage production of Show Boat on December 27, 1927, by Jules Bledsoe, who also sang it in the part-talkie 1929 film and, although that film version had little to do with the stage musical. Bledsoe also recorded the song years later. However, the most famous rendition of it, one that is still noted today, was sung by Paul Robeson in James Whale's classic 1936 film version of Show Boat. (Robeson had first performed the song in the 1928 London production of the show and in the 1932 Broadway revival.) The song became an American classic, and was performed by many musicians and musical groups, including Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra, Bix Beiderbecke, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Sam Cooke, Al Jolson, Screaming Jay Hawkins, Django Reinhardt, Ray Charles, Jim Croce, Jimmy Ricks and the Ravens, The Beach Boys, The Jeff Beck Group, and Aretha Franklin. William Warfield sang it in the 1951 Technicolor film version of Show Boat in another rendition that became very famous. (It became his signature song, and he performed it several times on television and in several stage revivals of Show Boat.) Melvin Franklin, the famous bass singer of The Temptations, performed it at most concerts, eventually making it his signature song. Judy Garland, one of the few female singers to attempt the song, sang a powerful and unforgettable[neutrality is disputed] rendition on her television show in 1963, followed by a studio recording.

Source

Fred Astaire - Puttin on the Ritz



Fred Astaire - Puttin on the Ritz - part of the film "Blue Skies" - 1946

"Puttin' on the Ritz" is a popular song written and published in 1929 by Irving Berlin and introduced by Harry Richman in the musical film Puttin' on the Ritz (1930). The title derives from the slang expression "putting on the Ritz," meaning to dress very fashionably. The expression was inspired by the swanky Ritz Hotel.
The song is in AABA form, with a verse.[1] According to John Mueller, the central device in the A section is the "use of delayed rhythmic resolution: a staggering, off-balance passage, emphasized by the unorthodox stresses in the lyric, suddenly resolves satisfyingly on a held note, followed by the forceful assertion of the title phrase." The marchlike B section, which is only barely syncopated, acts as a contrast to the previous rhythmic complexities.[1] According to Alec Wilder, in his study of American popular song, the rhythmic pattern in "Puttin' on the Ritz" is "the most complex and provocative I have ever come upon."[2]
The original version of Berlin's song included references to the then-popular fad of flashily-dressed but poor black Harlemites parading up and down Lenox Avenue, "Spending ev'ry dime / For a wonderful time". The song was featured with the original lyrics in the 1939 film Idiot's Delight, where it was performed by Clark Gable and chorus, and this routine was selected for inclusion in That's Entertainment (1974). For the film Blue Skies (1946), where it was performed by Fred Astaire, Berlin revised the lyrics to apply to affluent whites strutting "up and down Park Avenue."[3]
Hit phonograph records of the tune in its original popularity of 1929-1930 were recorded by Harry Richman and Fred Astaire, with whom the song is particularly associated.
Source

Bing Crosby - Swinging on a Star

The great classic "Swinging on a Star" (written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Johnny Burke) as sung by Bing Crosby and the boy's chorus of the movie "Going My Way."